#WhyDisabledPeopleDropout is Showing the Horrors of Being a Disabled Student

Hello, everybody and welcome to May!

 

Recently, I have been scrolling through Twitter and one hashtag keeps popping up. It is, #WhyDisabledPeopleDropout. It was made to bring attention to the unique struggles that disabled students face. This sparked a myriad of responses. A large proportion spoke about the lack of support from staff. As well as, accessibility issues, and general chronic illness.

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Here, Kayle Hill discussed the ongoing struggle of not being able to get to classrooms. Meaning that we are segregated from the campus and other people. However, the staff puts this issue at the bottom of the totem pole, which is very common.

 

In another post, Sarah Brunke puts a lot of our problems in a very simple sentence:

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Many others discussed people accusing us of “special treatment.” Including the professors not understanding us in any way.

 

University is hard for everyone but having a disability on top of the already ever-growing stresses can make it feel impossible. Having said that, I thought I would share my experiences with the university. I am currently doing my second degree. This one is all online which makes it very hard. I can’t explain my condition to my lecturers. I have very little communication with anyone relating to the course. However, if I am having a bad day, I can take the morning off with ease, and do whatever I need to do to function. Saying that my first degree was on campus and I loved it. I know that my university was unique. I had an amazing disability support officer, and to be honest, I ignored my disability as much as I could. To be honest, it wasn’t healthy, and it destroyed my body to the point where I was in bed for almost two years. But I managed to survive with somewhat decent grades.

 

I didn’t have high expectations when attending university. In fact, most of my fuel to survive came from my high school teachers telling me I wasn’t smart enough to do it. (Well, smart enough and it will be too difficult with my disability). The truth is, whilst my university experience was good — for the most part — my high school experience was horrific. My wheelchair couldn’t get into any of the classrooms. I had to park it outside of the classroom, walk inside and climb a step. I got accused of special treatment and attention seeking on almost a daily basis. In fact, one of those accusers was a teacher. I was forced to have a teaching aid because I got one D when no one else who got a D had to have one. I told the teacher’s I didn’t need or want one and they forced it, all because I’m disabled. I even got kicked out of a class I enjoyed all because they refused to move the class to a room without stairs. Yes, that’s right, they didn’t have a lift. Well, they did, except it NEVER worked. However, the real kick in the guts for me was sports sessions. Part of the school’s curriculum was five hours of sport a week. If you missed the bus you had to sit in a room in silence and write lines for the entire time. If you had an injury, you also had to sit in the room. On occasion, we were allowed to do homework but most of the time we still had to write lines. For me, that meant that I spent five hours a week being punished for the fact that my legs can’t do netball. I’m sorry, but what kind of garbage is that? My parents and I kept complaining but no one would do anything until my senior year. At one point my vice principal claimed that she gave me an option to go home but I preferred to stay in detention. Yeah, that seems legit. Who wouldn’t choose writing lines over the beach?

 

By the time I graduated, I had accepted this. I thought that was just how the world works and it was all I had to look forward to. I didn’t ever think education could be any different. So, when I say, I had very low expectations for university I mean, extremely almost non-existent ones. However, I was surprised, and was actually listened to!

 

I tell this story for two reasons. One is to shed a light on educational systems and disabilities. This is both for students and employees to try and have an idea about what it’s like for us. The second is for disabled students, I know it is so dang hard. I know it seems hopeless and horrific but doing university can be possible! It may require changing universities and kicking up a fuss, but if you want it, take it. You deserve to try and achieve your dreams. Please don’t let anyone take that away from you. Especially if the person trying to rip apart your dreams is just an ignorant human being. You deserve so much better and you’re not alone, I promise.

 

Until next time, be kind to one another.

See you next time,

Bethany

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3 thoughts on “#WhyDisabledPeopleDropout is Showing the Horrors of Being a Disabled Student

  1. Oh my goodness! I’m writing about this too, but with a different experience (no wheelchair). I think it is deplorable that this is happening on campuses around the world. 😡 I’m sorry that your experience was so terrible, but I’m very glad that you are raising awareness about it!

    Liked by 1 person

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